Kfpp: Casting off and pattern reading

The author is not responsible for any injuries, illness, and/or death related to kniting, including but not limited to stabbing self with needle, strangulation by yarn, irritation due to type of yarn used, pummeling by others due to being scared by the knitter’s trying to figure out how exactly their sweater was knitted.

 

~

Casting off! (also known as binding off!)

This is a critical part of the project. A bit like if I didn’t finish sentences with periods It’s annoying isn’t it Or does the Internet not care about periods anymore If you don’t cast off, your project will unravel and die and shrivel up in a corner and you’ll get a pile of yarn You don’t want a pile of yarn

So you have your (finished << THIS IS CRITICAL) project. You can start with either side.

IMG_0003

Knit/purl two stitches, whichever you prefer.

IMG_0004

Pull the first stitch over the second one.

Knit another stitch. Repeat until end of row.

IMG_0008

(there’s another stitch at the end that’s already been cast off. You can’t see it very well)

At which time you will get something like this:

IMG_0009

Cut the last loop and pull tight. You should probably also weave the loose end into the stitches. I don’t have a picture for this one because I didn’t want to cut the yarn. You’re smart. You can figure it out.

 

Pattern reading:

I suck at this. I suck so much I use my own system for writing patterns. Here’s what I consider the official magical master list for knitting pattern decodation: http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/knit.html

The ones I use: K (knit), P (purl), ** (to mark off repeating, e.g. “*k2 p2* until end of row”) (also used: parentheses, brackets, single asterisks). DPN for double pointed needles. I have decided right now to adopt St st (stockinette stitch: when you alternate knitting and purling rows) and CO/BO (cast on/bind off). Sometimes I use R for rows. I think that’s it…

Also often used, at least in my opinion: WS/RS (wrong/right side of fabric, or the side that’s seen), rep (repeat), dec/inc (decrease/increase, which I shall address next. which leaves you one post further from dpns) (I use d/i, because i’m THAT LAZY)

You will also see all of these abbreviations uncapitalized.

So I’ll rewrite last time’s pattern in abbreviations (assuming Fairly Thick yarn and needles):

  1. CO 6
  2. St st to desired length
  3. BO

 

A fairly simple pattern. A really simple pattern. Among the simplest patterns you will ever see. As always, you should mess around with length, yarn type, knitting needle size, and whatever else you feel like messing around with.

but wait we’re poor people we don’t have that kind of money

Once we get to dpns all hell will break loose. ALL my weird projects involve dpns. Would you guys prefer it if I did DPNs before increasing/decreasing but wait both patterns require that?

Very well, cruel world, I shall do increasing/decreasing stitches first.

IF THERE ARE ANY *EXTREMELY* COMMONLY USED ABBREVIATIONS OR MISTAKES I MADE PLEASE COMMENT BELOW.

~

The double-pointed

needle is a wooden sword

made to poke eyes out.

^^^ macabre much

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4 thoughts on “Kfpp: Casting off and pattern reading”

    1. Get an audiobook and knit while you’re listening. It’s an excellent excuse. And try not to loose track of the number of rows while not loosing track of where the book is going (at which I perpetually fail).
      (:D + jazz hands, because one can never have enough jazz hands)

      Liked by 1 person

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